Business owners and patrons of some communities within the Lake Bosomtwe enclave are raising red flags over a compulsory taxation by the Bosomtwe Assembly of persons making trips to towns in the area.

All persons travelling to Abonu and its surroundings, excluding indigenes, are charged fees ranging from one to 15 cedis for development projects.
For close to five years the Bosomtwe Assembly has blocked the only gateway to communities surrounding the Lake.

Passengers of all commercial and private vehicles are made to disembark and pay one to 15 cedis each to be allowed entry.

Ghanaians visiting friends and family and foreigners who have booked reservations at Hospitality outlets at the Lakeside are sometimes turned away after heated exchanges.

Operators of businesses around the lake say the practice is killing their businesses.

Luv Fm’s Erastus Asare Donkor reports that all vehicles travelling to towns and villages around the lake are stopped and persons onboard asked to pay development levies.

Passengers who claim to live around the lake are quizzed and probed for over an hour to establish their true identities.

On public holidays, rights to the lake are sold to private individuals and armed police and macho men who ensure all passengers pay between five and fifteen cedis

The practice sometimes results in physical confrontation and commercial vehicles are made to leave behind people who cannot pay.

The compulsory development levies are affecting hospitality outlets around the lake.

Despite the monies made by the assembly, Abonu and its surrounding villages have seen little support in the provision of proper toilet, waste and educational facilities.

DCE for Bosomtwe District, Madam Veronica Antwi-Adjei, insists the Lake is the only source of revenue for the area.
 


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