Source: Daily Graphic Ghana - The Paramount Chief of Akwamu in the Eastern Region, Odeneho Nana Kwafo Akoto III, has urged traditional authorities to discourage the use of imported liquor in the performance of traditional rites.

He has, therefore, urged traditional councils across the country to rather use locally produced gin. According to him, the country’s liquor industry would grow and create opportunities for the unemployed youth if that was done. 
Odeneho Akoto, who is the first traditional ruler to have committed to the use of local gin for the performance of traditional rites in the Akwamu Traditional Area, made the call when the management of Kasapreko Company Limited (KCL) paid a courtesy call on him to reciprocate his familiarisation tour of the company recently.

He pointed out that while Russia was noted for its vodka and Britain for its whisky, which are products that have captivated the world over the years, Ghana ought to champion its locally made gin and other drinks. That would make locally produced gin synonymous with Ghana and promote it globally.

"Foreigners could be served with liquor produced by local distilleries as part of hospitality treats in restaurants and hotels when they visit the country," Odeneho Akoto suggested.

He commended the management of KCL for the number of development projects they had initiated in the Akwamu traditional area.

Odeneho Akoto, who summoned hotel operators in Akosombo and its environs, tasked them to endeavour to patronise locally produced drinks as part of efforts to promote local content in their businesses.

The Marketing Manager of KCL, Mr Gerald Bonsu, indicated that the company, as a leading alcoholic beverage producer, was determined to create opportunities that could create wealth for small and medium enterprises.

He stressed that with the Akwamu area noted as a hub of tourism, it behoved managers of tourist facilities to identify and patronised locally branded products that could retain earnings in the country.

"It is high time Ghanaian companies traded among themselves just as African countries are doing to aid development. This could reduce the pressure on our currency against major trading ones," Mr Bonsu stressed.

"It is our hope that the willingness of traditional councils to adopt the use of indigenous brands in their activities will boost trade and further enhance the growth of local industries," he reiterated.

Mr Bonsu, on behalf of the company, presented cash and assorted drinks to the chief to support his community's upcoming Akwasidae Festival celebrations.


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